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Review Highlights
A Lovely well laid out museum

A very informative and interesting museum which would have benefited from more translation on the... read more

Reviewed 29 July 2018
A1n2thony
,
Fordingbridge, United Kingdom
via mobile
Glass museum

Wonderful display of glass blowing artisans. Charming and historic. I highly recommend it. Provides... read more

Reviewed 7 July 2018
George R
,
Leland, North Carolina
via mobile
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All reviews glass blowing history of glass making interesting museum glass bottles museo tom owner webb tour
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Reviewed 13 June 2017

While in Piegaro, Tom Webb, owner of L'Antica Vetreria gave us a tour of the Museo del Vetro. This museum provided an interesting overview of glass blowing and making. Tom was able to provide a lot about the history of glass making in Piegaro.

Thank George T
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 10 May 2017 via mobile

We had just a quick tour a/c of short time but interesting.. our tour guide was very formative. Local history...

Thank milehidi
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 30 June 2016

Tom Webb, owner of L'Antica Vetreria, led us on a very interesting tour of this museum and former glass factory. We saw how sand was heated to form glass and how the workers extracted molten glass from the pool, which was heated by wood fire. We could see how they controlled the temperature of the blown glass as it cooled. So rudimentary and also complex was the production. The museum has fine examples of all the kinds of glass bottles, jugs, vessels, etc. It was a very interesting museum tour.

Thank travelbuddy90
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 29 November 2015

In 1292 the rulers of Venice decreed that all glass blowing was to move to the island of Murano, as this was a way to protect the city from burning from the glass workshops. The artists became virtual prisoners to their craft as the Venetians attempted to keep a monopoly on glass making and the blowers, under pain of death, were kept permanently on the island.
However, aided by local monks, two craftsmen did manage to escape and traveled south to Piegaro, near the shores of Lake Trasimeno. The sturdy walled town was an ideal place to establish their own furnaces and glass making business. They soon gained a reputation for producing quality glass; and, in 1312, their services were called upon to make the glass tiles used in the glass mosaics of the facade for Orvieto’s new Duomo.
This glass works continued until the beginning of WWII when it was occupied by German soldiers. This was a sad time in the history of Piegaro, for when Germans left, the beautiful Comune Palazzo building was mined and destroyed. Finally, in 1968, the 750-year history of glass making within the town center came to an end as the furnaces were shut down and left to cool.

We were a little disappointed in the Museum of Glass – did not have much there to see– we could see the ovens in which they formerly used to blow glass. The story is more interesting than the museum.

1  Thank Maggi713
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 24 November 2015

Take your time and make sure to go to the lower level and poke your head into the area where the glass spilled out of the original furnace.

Thank Mark K
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
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