Sights & landmarks in Uptown

Top 10 Landmarks in Uptown (Chicago)

Sights in Uptown

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Things to do ranked using Tripadvisor data including reviews, ratings, photos, and popularity.

What travellers are saying

  • Sandra V
    San Francisco, CA51 contributions
    We took a cab up to Andersonville upon a recommendation. What a lovely area! Very safe. Very clean. Lots of local shops. Great restaurants. Large LGBTQ community. Everyone is friendly. We are looking forward to returning!
    Written 24 May 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Marcia W
    10 contributions
    Graceland is a wonderful and very historical final resting place. When I visit Graceland there is a sense of peace. The beautiful grounds, monuments that tell the story gives one that comfort and feeling that those resting here are surely at peace. I recommend a visit to this one of a kind serene place.
    Written 26 June 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • crunch6
    Northbrook, IL632 contributions
    This is a HIDDEN TREASURE in Chicago that so few people know of. We came here for Open Chicago and it was delightful to see everyone's faces just mesmerized by the huge train set. It is open on Friday nights and also on November 14th for an Open House. GO!!!
    Written 20 October 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • crunch6
    Northbrook, IL632 contributions
    There is so much to learn here and the members are so passionate about sharing information about this temple that has been here since the Japanese concentration camps in the USA opened in the 40's. Make sure to see the silent room and the hand-carved altar. Thank you for opening at Open House Chicago!
    Written 20 October 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Taylor B
    Chicago, IL7,645 contributions
    Charlie Chaplin was here. So was Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks Sr. And Bronco Billy Anderson, Ben Turpin, Wallace Beery, Gloria Swanson, Harold lloyd, Tom Mix and Francis X. Bushman. This is where Hollywood began--the Essanay Studios at 1333-1345 West Argyle Street in Chicago's Uptown neighborhood. The studio was founded in 1907. Its first film, "An Awful Skate" or "The Hobo on Rollers," starring Ben Turpin (then the studio janitor), was produced for only a couple hundred dollars and released in July 1907. It grossed several thousand dollars and the studio began to prosper. In 1914, Essanay succeeded in hiring Charlie Chaplin away from Mack Sennett's Keystone Studios, offering him a higher salary and his own production unit. He made 14 short comedies for Essanay in 1915, including the landmark "The Tramp" with the famous shot of the lonely tramp with his back to the camera, walking down the road dejectedly, then squaring his shoulders optimistically and heading for his next adventure. Chaplin disliked the unpredictable weather of Chicago and left after only one year for sunny California and more money and more creative control. The Essanay building was later taken over by independent producer Norman Wilding, who made industrial films. In the early 1970s, a portion of the studio was offered to Columbia College for a dollar but the offer lapsed without action. Then it was given to a non-profit television corporation which sold it. One tenant was the midwest office of Technicolor. Today the Essanay lot is the home of St. Augustine's College and its main meeting hall has been named the Charlie Chaplin Auditorium. The studio was designated a Chicago Landmark by the Commission on Chicago Landmarks in 1996 and acknowledged as the most important structure connected to the city's role in the history of motion pictures.
    Written 29 December 2014
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Elias
    Chicago, IL861 contributions
    I haven't seen a lot of churches in Chicago, bit for sure this one is beautiful. The exterior is very impressive and good to look at. The interior is beautiful as well.
    Written 25 April 2016
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Annaline
    Park Ridge, IL7,031 contributions
    This domed church built in 1916 was moved across Ashland Avenue and rotated in 1929 by a team of 50 men and horses, then cut in half and expanded in the middle!
    Written 2 January 2016
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Taylor B
    Chicago, IL7,645 contributions
    It is difficult to understand why the Carrie Eliza Tomb in Chicago's historic Graceland Cemetery isn't listed on TripAdvisor's website. Built in 1890, it was designed by the noted American architect Louis Sullivan. Today, it is widely recognized as one of the most photographed tombs in the United States and the most significant piece of architecture in Graceland Cemetery. It was declared a Chicago Landmark in 1971 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. The tomb was commissioned by lumber baron Henry Harrison Getty for his wife, Carrie Eliza Getty. When approaching the tomb, which stands on its own triangular plot of land, the obvious focus is the ornate doorway, which features an intricately ornamented bronze gate and door and a board semi-circular archway. The tomb is composed of limestone masonry construction. A cube in shape, the bottom half of the tomb is composed of large, smooth limestone blocks while the upper half is composed of a rectangular pattern of octagons, each containing an eight-pointed starburst design. The cornice is banded with smooth limestone above intricate spiraling patterns below. There are many architectural masterpieces in Graceland, including the Potter Palmer Memorial, but there is nothing to match the one-and-only Getty Tomb.
    Written 2 October 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Taylor B
    Chicago, IL7,645 contributions
    There are many celebrated Chicagoans who are buried in historic Graceland Cemetery at 4001 North Clark Street, at Irving Park Road, in Chicago's Uptown neighborhood, north of Wrigley Field. Without a doubt, however, the gravesite of noted architect and city planner Daniel Burnham is located in the most beautiful setting in the cemetery. Burnham and his family are buried under natural glacial granite boulders on a small island near the north end of Lake Willomere, reachable by a permanent footbridge. Burnham (1846-1912), recognized as the "Father of City Planning," directed the World's Columbian Exposition in 1892 and 1893, designed famous buildings in New York City, Washington DC and Chicago, built Wacker Drive and lakefront parks in Chicago and, at the time of death, headed the largest architectural firm in the world, the model for global architectural businesses. When you tour Graceland, you will be impressed by Potter Palmer's Memorial, Martin Ryerson's Mausoleum, Louis Sullivan's Getty Mausoleum and Lorado Taft's Statue of Death sculpture. And you will undoubtedly seek out the gravesites of Marshall Field, Cyrus McCormick, Joseph Medill, boxing champion Jack Johnson, meatpacking magnate Phillip Armour and baseball Hall of Famer Ernie Banks. But you will dwell for more than a few minutes at Daniel Burnham's burial site.
    Written 2 October 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Taylor B
    Chicago, IL7,645 contributions
    There are many reasons to visit historic Graceland Cemetery at 4001 North Clark Street in Chicago's Uptown neighborhood. It is the burial site of many notable Chicagoans and it features several mausoleums and burial sites that are masterpieces of architecture and landscape. One is the Potter Palmer and Bertha Honore Palmer Memorial. Erected in 1921, it is a monument to two of the giants of Chicago development and high society. Potter Palmer (1826-1902) was a business tycoon and real estate developer who built State Street and the Palmer House Hotel. Bertha Honore Palmer (1850-1918) was considered the queen of Chicago high society and patron of impressionist artists. They lived in a Gothic Castle at 1350 North Lake Shore Drive, once the largest private residence in Chicago. Today, they lie within the two large granite sarcophagi of the massive memorial structure, which is embellished with flowery garlands and inverted torches symbolizing death. Designed by architects McKim, Mead and White, it is built in the style of a Greek temple, the largest and most significant tomb in Graceland Cemetery. Sixteen massive ionic columns ring the structure and a line of antifixes stand at attention along the roofline. Three generations of the Palmers' descendants lie beneath the floor around time. The tomb was Palmer's way of displaying his wealth in a big way. How wealthy was Potter Palmer? When his hotel was destroyed by the Great Chicago Fire of 1871, he borrowed $2 million from an insurance company, the largest amount lent to a private individual up to that time, and rebuilt State Street and the Palmer House Hotel and turned swampland into North Lake Shore Drive.
    Written 2 October 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.