Chicago Cemeteries

Cemeteries in Chicago, IL

Chicago Cemeteries

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What travellers are saying

  • Aydenwood
    Philadelphia, PA166 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Lovely historic cemetery, well maintained. Great for walking and exploring. We saw others with picnic baskets and some just walking dogs or jogging. Lots of shade as well as sun.
    Written 14 July 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Taylor B
    Chicago, IL8,277 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    When the conversation turns to cemeteries, most Chicagoans think of Graceland. But a little bit of research might change your mind. Rosehill, Graceland's sister cemetery, has all the trappings of Arlington National Cemetery in Washington DC and Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, Virginia. Located at 5800 North Ravenswood Avenue on the city's northwest side, in the Lincoln Square community, it is Chicago's largest cemetery with 350 acres. Founded in 1859, it is significant for several reasons. Start with Rosehill's Joliet/limestone entrance gate, which was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975. Marvel at the Rosehill Mausoleum, the largest mausoleum in Chicago with two levels, floors of Italian Carrara marble and stained glass windows designed by Louis Comfort Tiffany. And the Horatio N. May Chapel with a blend of Gothic and Romanesque styles, a granite exterior and an interior appointed with mosaic floors. The list of distinguished burials includes several Illinois governors, Chicago mayors, generals, civic leaders, business tycoons, sports figures and celebrities. As a Civil War buff, I'm most interested in the fact that Rosehill is the burial place for 350 Union soldiers and sailors and at least three Confederates, including several members of the 8th Illinois Cavalry, which fired the first shots at Gettysburg, and General John McArthur, who helped Ulysses S. Grant avoid surrender at Shiloh. Rosehill has the distinction of being the largest private burial ground of Union veterans, including 16 generals and six drummer boys, in the state of Illinois. In fact, Rosehill opened its own Civil War museum in 1995. It highlights the roles played by generals and soldiers buried on the property and Chicago's part in the war.
    Written 7 June 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Cathryn M
    Illinois3 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Beautiful grounds! Lots to see! Recommend taking a tour sothat you can be sure and hit the highlights!
    Written 20 June 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • howard p M
    Chicago, IL78 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    There are some very well executed grave markers and memorials in this cemetery. One of a must-see in Chicago.
    Written 30 July 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Taylor B
    Chicago, IL8,277 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Every time my wife and I walk through Lincoln Park we pass the Couch Mausoleum, which is situated on a hill on the north side of the Chicago History Museum overlooking the intersection of North La Salle Drive and North Stockton Street. The massive stone vault has been resting on this plot of land since it was erected in 1858 and remains the oldest structure standing within the 1871 Great Chicago Fire zone. It was built for Ira Couch, a wealthy hotel owner who died at the age of 50 while wintering in Cuba. Even today, the mausoleum is shrouded in mystery. Why was this tomb left behind on the site of the Chicago City Cemetery when the land was converted to Lincoln Park in 1869? And how many people are entombed in the 50-ton crypt, seven family members or 13 or merely Couch alone? According to one report, a man entered the tomb to do some cleanup work and claimed it was empty. Curiously, Couch has a headstone at Rosehill Cemetery on Chicago's Northwest Side. But Couch isn't listed on Rosehill's records. So the mystery goes on. But the Couch Mausoleum is very real.
    Written 18 May 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Taylor B
    Chicago, IL8,277 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Chicago's Graceland Cemetery is one of the most historic and picturesque cemeteries in the United States, in a class with Arlington National Cemetery in Washington DC and Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, Virginia. And one of the reasons why is the Carrie Eliza Getty Tomb, acknowledged as the most significant piece of architecture in the 121-acre garden/arboretum located at Clark Street and Irving Park Road on the city's North Side, north of Wrigley Field. Commissioned in 1890 by the lumber baron, Henry Harrison Getty, for his wife, the tomb was designed by the noted American architect, Louis Sullivan, who also designed the Martin Ryerson Mausoleum for Getty's late partner, which also stands in Graceland Cemetery. The Getty Tomb is said to be the beginning of Sullivan's involvement in the architectural style known as the Chicago School. It stands on its own triangular plot of land and is composed of limestone masonry construction. Roughly a cube in shape, the bottom half is composed of large, smooth limestone blocks while the upper half is composed of a rectangular pattern of octagons, each containing an eight-pointed starburst design. The cornice is banded with smooth limestone above intricate spiraling patterns below and the top-edge of the roofline is straight and horizontal on the front and back and scalloped in a concave fashion on the sides. But what is most compelling about the design with the ornate doorway, an intricately ornamented bronze gate and door, spanned by a broad semi-circular archway. Henry Getty joined his wife in the tomb after his death in 1919 and their only child was added in 1946. In 1971, the tomb as designated a Chicago Landmark. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.
    Written 13 May 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Taylor B
    Chicago, IL8,277 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    There are many reasons to visit historic Graceland Cemetery at 4001 North Clark Street in Chicago's Uptown neighborhood. It is the burial site of many notable Chicagoans and it features several mausoleums and burial sites that are masterpieces of architecture and landscape. One is the Potter Palmer and Bertha Honore Palmer Memorial. Erected in 1921, it is a monument to two of the giants of Chicago development and high society. Potter Palmer (1826-1902) was a business tycoon and real estate developer who built State Street and the Palmer House Hotel. Bertha Honore Palmer (1850-1918) was considered the queen of Chicago high society and patron of impressionist artists. They lived in a Gothic Castle at 1350 North Lake Shore Drive, once the largest private residence in Chicago. Today, they lie within the two large granite sarcophagi of the massive memorial structure, which is embellished with flowery garlands and inverted torches symbolizing death. Designed by architects McKim, Mead and White, it is built in the style of a Greek temple, the largest and most significant tomb in Graceland Cemetery. Sixteen massive ionic columns ring the structure and a line of antifixes stand at attention along the roofline. Three generations of the Palmers' descendants lie beneath the floor around time. The tomb was Palmer's way of displaying his wealth in a big way. How wealthy was Potter Palmer? When his hotel was destroyed by the Great Chicago Fire of 1871, he borrowed $2 million from an insurance company, the largest amount lent to a private individual up to that time, and rebuilt State Street and the Palmer House Hotel and turned swampland into North Lake Shore Drive.
    Written 2 October 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Taylor B
    Chicago, IL8,277 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    There are many celebrated Chicagoans who are buried in historic Graceland Cemetery at 4001 North Clark Street, at Irving Park Road, in Chicago's Uptown neighborhood, north of Wrigley Field. Without a doubt, however, the gravesite of noted architect and city planner Daniel Burnham is located in the most beautiful setting in the cemetery. Burnham and his family are buried under natural glacial granite boulders on a small island near the north end of Lake Willomere, reachable by a permanent footbridge. Burnham (1846-1912), recognized as the "Father of City Planning," directed the World's Columbian Exposition in 1892 and 1893, designed famous buildings in New York City, Washington DC and Chicago, built Wacker Drive and lakefront parks in Chicago and, at the time of death, headed the largest architectural firm in the world, the model for global architectural businesses. When you tour Graceland, you will be impressed by Potter Palmer's Memorial, Martin Ryerson's Mausoleum, Louis Sullivan's Getty Mausoleum and Lorado Taft's Statue of Death sculpture. And you will undoubtedly seek out the gravesites of Marshall Field, Cyrus McCormick, Joseph Medill, boxing champion Jack Johnson, meatpacking magnate Phillip Armour and baseball Hall of Famer Ernie Banks. But you will dwell for more than a few minutes at Daniel Burnham's burial site.
    Written 2 October 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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