Monuments & Statues in Chicago

THE 10 BEST Chicago Monuments & Statues

Monuments & Statues in Chicago

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60 places sorted by traveller favourites
  • Things to do ranked using Tripadvisor data including reviews, ratings, photos, and popularity.
Showing results 1-30 of 60

What travellers are saying

  • Mathias n
    6 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Fun to see but the bean was fenced off for some reason put a real damper on the visit. I assume it’s either a short term project or for the winter weather. Regardless it was cool would like to see it up close next time.
    Written 27 March 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • TravelingSoccerLoon
    Saint Paul, MN4,994 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Located at Daley Plaza, the great Pablo Picasso's gift to the city of Chicago was unveiled in 1967. It was the first significant public abstract work of art in the city. Initially met with great dislike, it is now more appreciated and has become an iconic landmark in Chicago's Loop. Definitely worth a look and a photo if nearby or even can be appreciated from the street as you drive by it.
    Written 10 March 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • TravelingSoccerLoon
    Saint Paul, MN4,994 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Alexander Calder's Flamingo has sat at Federal Plaza in Chicago's Loop since 1974. It is a much-photographed piece of art and has become quite an iconic part of downtown Chicago. Certainly, worth a drive by and if you have time to kill, it's a nice spot to sit during the warmer months of the year.
    Written 10 March 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Irina
    United States13,236 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The Elks National Memorial and Headquarters (The Elks) is located across from Lincoln Park, at North Lake Ave.

    The building was originally planned by Benevolent Protective Order of Elks -- a fraternal order -- as a memorial to a thousand Elks brothers, lost in World War I. The memorial was designed by a renowned American architect Egerton Swartwout, and built in 1924 -- 1926.

    The rotunda and friezes on the north and south of the memorial, made of marble and limestone, look very impressive, as well as two bronze statues of elks with a memorial plaque, in front of the rotunda.

    The Elks National Memorial was rededicated several times, and the last time in 1994, to honor the veterans of World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the later military conflicts.

    In 2003, The Elks National Memorial was designated Chicago Landmark.

    The Elks National Memorial is free to public visits, it's open from April 15 through November 15; although during our visit the memorial was closed, we enjoyed its grand looks from outside.
    Written 10 March 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Brad
    Hong Kong, China173,044 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The Lincoln Memorial is just a couple minutes walk east of the Chicago History Museum at Lincoln Park. What you will see is a 12-ft bronze of 16th President (1809-1865) standing in front of a decorative chair.

    It is the work of Sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens (1887) and is situated in centre of a platform with a semi-circular structure with seating. It is a nice memorial, one of a handful of interesting monuments you'll find scattered around Lincoln Park.
    Written 7 May 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Taylor B
    Chicago, IL8,228 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Since 1978, when merchants around the intersection of Lawrence, Lincoln and Western on Chicago's North Side persuaded the local chamber of commerce to develop Lincoln Square, a pedestrian plaza that required a controversial rerouting of local traffic, it has become a popular destination for dining and shopping with a wide variety of restaurants and European-style shops. Bounded by Lawrence to the north, Montrose to the south, Clark to the east and Damen to the west, it is one of 77 well-defined communities in Chicago, which includes the Ravenswood residential subdivision and historic Rosehill Cemetery. In the 1830s and 1840s, the area was settled by Swiss, German and English immigrants who established produce farms. Later, the farmland gradually began to fill up with bungalows, two-flats and small apartment buildings. Two new developments, Ravenswood Manor and Ravenswood Gardens, attracted new residents. After World War II, empty storefronts spurred local merchants to find new ways to attract customers. In 1956, they erected a statue of Abraham Lincoln for whom the area and the major street were named. And in 1978, they developed Lincoln Square. Today, it is home to such restaurants as Cafe Selmarie, Luella's Southern Kitchen, Bourbon Cafe, Garcia's Restaurant and Artango Bar & Steakhouse and such attractions as Gene's Sausage Shop, Quake Collectibles, Ravenswood Used Books, Merz Apothecary, Conrad Sulzer Library, Book Cellar, Davis Theater and Old Town School of Folk Music.
    Written 9 November 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • sanju_222323
    New Jersey15,792 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Located on the corner of Michigan Avenue and Randolph Street, the tree-lined area of Wrigley Square is an open space for visitors to relax on the lawn. consists of impressive Roman Doric-styled 24-paired columns made from Indiana limestone reinforced by steel rods and plates.

    The Square is anchored by the Millennium Monument (Peristyle), a nearly full-sized replica of the original peristyle that stood in the same location between 1917 and 1953. With its graceful semi-circular row of Doric-style columns that rise nearly 40 feet, the Millennium Monument ties the past to the present and supports the designation of Michigan Avenue as a landmark district.
    Written 19 April 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Irina
    United States13,236 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Ulysses S. Grant Monument in Lincoln Park was dedicated in 1891 to commemorate and honor Ulysses S. Grant (1822 -- 1885) -- the American Civil War general and the 18th President of the US (1869 -- 1877). The monument was designed by Louis Rebisso, and Burling & Whitehouse architects.

    The bronze equestrian sculpture on a granite pedestal atop an arched structure -- the total height of the monument is 42ft (12,9m) -- makes the monument look grand and very impressive. Placed on the elevated grounds of the vast park, it can be viewed from various angles and distances, and the monument evokes deep feelings of respect, memory and esteem for the distinguished statesman in the history of the United States.

    Ulysses S. Grant Monument is one of the best monuments we've seen in Lincoln Park.
    Written 29 February 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Brad
    Hong Kong, China173,044 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The Vietnam Veterans Fountain is located along the Riverwalk just west of the Herald Square Monument. The monument is the work of American writer, artist and Vietnam Vet Gary Tillery (2005) and is dedicated to those who served in all branches of the armed forces during the war.

    You will see a rectangular shaped pool and stone wall with the engraving Chicago Remembers above the list of names of those from the State of Illinois who died in the conflict. It is a fine memorial and tribute, worth spending a few minutes of your time while visiting the Riverwalk.
    Written 6 May 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Beth T
    Washington DC, DC4 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    This was the highlight of my trip to Chicago! I love Bob Newhart and being able to sit on his couch was such an amazing treat!
    Written 11 October 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Taylor B
    Chicago, IL8,228 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    I remember Chicago's Union Stock Yards. In the 1950s, when my friends and I used to attend major league baseball games at Comiskey Park. We could smell the odor emanating from the nearby meatpacking industry that was described as the "hog butcher of the world" from 1865 to 1971. Today, all that is left is the Union Stock Yard Gate. Located on Exchange Avenue at Peoria Street on Chicago's South Side, it was the eastern entrance to the famous Union Stock Yards, which occupied over 475 acres to the west, and is the only significant structural element to survive. It was designed a Chicago Landmark in 1972, was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1972 and acclaimed a National Historic Landmark in 1981. The plaza surrounding the gate also includes the city's principal memorial to its firefighters. The gate is a limestone construction with a central main arch flanked by two smaller arches. The main arch is 16 feet wide and 17 feet high with the surmounting truncated hip roof giving the structure a total height of 32 feet. One of the side arches retains an iron grillwork gate of a style that both of side arches would have originally had. The gate, designed by the notable architects Daniel Burnham and John W. Root, and an accompanying gatehouse (since demolished) were the only substantial buildings to survive a fire that leveled the stock yards in 1934. Restored in the 1970s, after the stock yards were closed, the limestone gate now stands as one of the few reminders of Chicago's past dominance in the meatpacking industry. Over the center arch of the gate is a bust of Sherman, the favorite bull of Union Stock Yards founder John B. Sherman.
    Written 15 May 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Brad
    Hong Kong, China173,044 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    There are a handful of large public artworks scattered around downtown including The piece known as Miro's Chicago (formerly known as The Sun, The Moon and One Star) that is located along West Washington Street across from the large scale Picasso installation.

    This is the work of Catalan artist Joan Miró (1981). What you see is an abstract figure made of steel, wire mesh, bronze, concrete and ceramic tiles. It is 12 metres tall and resembles a creature composed of various parts and brought to life. It quickly reminds one of various monsters found in Miró's many paintings and sculptures.

    Have a look of you are in the area and interested in viewing public artworks. There are others by Dubuffet, Picasso, Chagall and Calder nearby that you can take in as well.
    Written 3 May 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Grigol M
    Ozurgeti, Georgia219 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    I like public art displayed in the streets and squares. This huge construction has big open space surrounding. Great place to people watch. It is easy to notice from transport or by walking. It is right in front of Thompson Center.
    Written 9 December 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • psudino
    Weehawken, NJ4,305 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    This statue is General George Washington, and the two principal financers of the American Revolution, Robert Morris and Haym Salomon. Around the back is a beautiful carving of the statue of liberty welcoming the huddled masses that eventually made our country the great nation it is today. The only reason I know about that is doing a quick Google search to understand what I was looking at.

    It seems like the statue was randomly placed without much regard for it's historical significance
    Written 25 November 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Allen21096
    Chicago, IL27,191 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    On 6 May 2017, the parish of St. Constance celebrated 100 years of scholastic achievement. After the parish was formed in 1916, the next thing that the parish needed was a school. In 1917, the school was established and the School Sisters of Notre Dame began teaching the first 72 parish children. Over the years it has provided for pre-school and kindergarten, a girl's high school (the former Cardinal Stritch High School, on the 2nd flr. of the old church building), a Saturday Polish language school and a full elementary school with grades 1 - 8. In 1959, the current elementary school was built and opened on the site of the old parish grotto. It was a huge improvement over the old school which was on the 3rd floor of the church building. The current principal, Eva M. Panczyk, has been at St. Constance School for many years, first as a teacher and later as its principal. St. Constance School is accredited by both the State of Illinois and the Archdiocese of Chicago and has been recognized for Academic Excellence for six consecutive years. The classrooms are outfitted with the latest technology to assist in the teaching. There are enrichment programs that consist of Homework Help Class, Lego Engineering Club, Martial Arts, Crochet Club, Bell Choir, Home Economics, Piano/Keyboard or Guitar Class and the Young Rembrandts. St. Constance parish & school was named after St. Constance who lived from 325 A.D. to 354 A.D. She was born the daughter of the Emperor, Constantine the Great and converted to Christianity after being cured of leprosy.
    Written 7 May 2017
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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