Forests in Hong Kong

Top Forests in Hong Kong, China

Forests in Hong Kong

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Nature & Parks
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What travellers are saying

  • Mairwen1
    United Kingdom6,324 contributions
    Don’t expect a traditional looking forest, with densely wooded trees and shaded groves. Mangroves are short, scrubby bushes that spread quickly and thickly across swampy, tidal areas.
    The Tai O mangrove forest covers an area of about 20+ hectares and although it is not conventionally beautiful, the real beauty lies in the fact that the mangroves create enormous biodiversity, have complex ecosystems and can store and stockpile carbon .
    They are pretty amazing plants - they are the only salt-tolerant tree in the world. They actually thrive in harsh, inhospitable areas where other plants would curl up their toes straight away. They are home to crabs, birds, white egrets, mangrove snakes and fish but, most importantly, they suck up a load of planet-destroying carbon.
    The Tai O mangroves have only thrived in recent years. Traditionally Tai O was a great producer of salt. For centuries extensive salt pans covered most of the area and whilst this remained big business, the mangroves were never able to get a foothold or flourish. Once the industry fell into decline, the saltpans were abandoned, leaving the mangroves to take over. Since 2005-2007, a conservation programme has strategically planted many additional local varieties and now manages the growth of the forest.
    Written 29 June 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • BradJill
    Hong Kong, China146,662 contributions
    One of the interesting places to see around Lai Chi Wo in the Plover Cove Country Park is the Fung Shui Woodlands just west of the historic village. There is a short wooden walkway along the edge of the forrest with a few information panels as well as three particular tree specimen that are well worth seeing if you enjoy ecology.

    At one end you will find a 19-metre tall Five-Fingered Camphor tree that is over 100 years old. You will also find a beautiful Autumn Maple with large hollows as well as another Autumn Maple covered by a network of Banyan Tree roots, creating a most unusual tree scene. Both of these are estimated to be over a century in age as well.

    You can walk past the Fung Shi Woodlands viewing the fine tree specimens in just 5 minutes. They are very interesting to see as part of your Lai Chi Wo village experience.
    Written 14 December 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • BradJill
    Hong Kong, China146,662 contributions
    Hok Tau is one of two small reservoirs near the western end of the Pat Sin Leng Country Park in the Northeast New Territories. It is situated at the end of the Hok Tau Road and accessible by foot from the campground and BBQ site around 1 km up the road or near the beginning of the Wilson Trail Stage #9.

    This is a small S shaped lake with a short and easy Family Walk trail that circles the reservoir as well as some of the surrounding forested areas. The lake shore is lined with fairly mature trees, giving it a nice appearance. There is a dam structure that you will see upon first approaching from the Hok Tau Road.

    The reservoir is in an attractive area of the Pat Sin Leng Country Park and can easily be taken in as part of your trek across the Wilson Trail. It isn't a bad location for BBQ and leisure with friends and families. There are picnic and BBQ areas situated around the lake. Unfortunately these are closed at the moment due to the pandemic but they will be open again at some point in the future.
    Written 6 April 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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