Speciality Museums in Hong Kong

Top Speciality Museums in Hong Kong, China

Speciality Museums in Hong Kong

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What travellers are saying

  • pindiyath100
    6 contributions
    Made my first visit of this year yesterday. Sure had tons of fun meeting my favorite celebrities! Had little trouble with the rotating pinkish blue overhead lighting above most of the displayed figures. Other than that it was worth the visit. Staff were very friendly as usual.

    Two wishes I've at the moment is if the displays could be used with just one type of overhead lighting and inclusion of refreshments outlet within the visiting area even if it's limited with bottles of plain water. I spent nearly 5 hours inside starting from the opening hours and desperately wished for a drop of water to drink....

    Will definitely visit again, awaiting the arrival of Manny Pacquiao!
    Written 2 October 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • globaltravellerworld
    Grasse, France405 contributions
    A MUST visit when coming to Hong Kong! The unsuspecting name does not reveal the true importance and value of this museum. It describes vividly the more than 300 years of trade between the West and China - especially the European trade with China via Hong Kong. We can learn that there is nothing new to this world - todays trade and relationship issues and mutual benefits for both worlds have not much changed in principle - all that changed is technology and media. We can learn from this museum that trade between the western world and China is mutually beneficial since hundreds of years - so we can truly relax a little bit in our overexcited times and refrain from getting carried away with the different political systems in place. It's does not matter on either side - Let's learn a bit from history and how we are in the end all just humans who want to have a decent good life ! this museum is very educational and teaches is us daily life in the "old times" and you will be surprised how close it is to the "new times" that we live in. Spend 2 hours there BUT GO ON WEEKENDS when volunteers are there to explain you details - otherwise you will not capture the essence of the trade history and how it relates to today's world. THE guides are very knowledgeable and competent and extremely friendly and helpful. A privately run Museum - my respect.
    Absolutely worth a visit.
    Written 12 December 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Mairwen1
    United Kingdom6,324 contributions
    The tea museum won’t be for everyone and is a small, niche museum. It’s housed inside the lovely old, colonial Flagstaff House (1846), a very stately white house, which is the oldest colonial building still standing in Hong Kong. Even if you don’t go inside, it’s worth strolling through the grounds of Hong Kong Park, past it.
    Entry is free and it has recently re-opened after closing during the covid 19 restrictions. Some sections are still closed, like the children’s playroom.
    The entire collection is only small with 8 separate rooms but the displays are well supported with good information on tea making ceremonies and traditions. Signs are in both English and Chinese.
    Some teaware dated back to 11th century BC. I found it astonishing to think that 3000+ years ago, people were brewing a cuppa, using these sophisticated, decorative bowls and ewers.
    The blue and white Ming dynasty china was extremely delicate and beautiful but I was equally intrigued by the rustic Yixing earthenware, with teapots and cups that imitated tree trunks and featured realistic looking grasshoppers and toads.
    There’s a small, good quality but expensive gift shop near the entry.
    Afterwards allow some time to wander through Hong Kong Park, past the waterfall, ponds and aviary.
    Written 15 June 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • bmartin992
    London, United Kingdom17 contributions
    A bit off the beaten track but well worth the effort to get there.
    The invasion of HK during WW2 was not a high-point in British colonial history, with HK being completely unprepared for the Japanese invasion from the mainland.
    Makes this historical event come alive.
    And found out that a family friend had actually played a key role in the escape of the one-armed Chinese general!
    Written 12 November 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • BradJill
    Hong Kong, China146,662 contributions
    The Asia Society Hong Kong Chapter has regular exhibitions each year, many which are very good and worth attending. They are almost always free to the public, come with brochures and at times audio downloads. Presently there is an exhibition titled Extended Figure, featuring masterpieces of 20th century Chinese artist, Lalan (until 21 Sept 2021). Exhibition hours are 11am to 6pm daily.

    Lalan (Xie Jing-lan) was born in China but spent most of her years in France where she developed a particular form of artistry known as integrated art which incorporates painting, music and dance and brings elements of east and west art forms together. LaLan's works creative contemporary works are peculiar compositions and worth spending time to view and ponder upon.

    The exhibition showcases around 30 works which are spaced out nicely in the Chantal Miller Gallery on the upper floor of the Asia Society compound. The gallery is nicely curated, lighting too bright on individual works, limiting photograph taking a bit. However, overall, it is a good exhibition that can be viewed comfortably in 30-45 minutes.
    Written 18 July 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • TheOExpress🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿🇭🇰
    Hong Kong, China3,952 contributions
    But they don’t, sadly. Still, this is a diverting if small museum to wander round for a bit, set aside from a really interesting area of the NT. Lots of information and some old trains here too.
    Written 13 July 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Edgar S
    Hong Kong, China1,472 contributions
    The founder of modern China, Dr. Sun Yat Sen has been in Hong Kong for many years to develop his strategies and planning for a modern China. The museum gives a great insight into his career, private life, and the countless efforts he has worked out for the modernization of China. There are plenty of exhibits of him, full of many documents and photographs. Beside the building wherein the museum is located in one of the early mansions built, located in the early days of British rule and owned by a well-established and famous Chinese family. Highly recommended to visit, to go back in time. The entrance is free. Great to plan for a rainy or hot summer day in Hong Kong. Recommended.
    Written 17 June 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Debbie T
    Brisbane, Australia713 contributions
    We didn’t know about this place. Our 8 and 12 year old had a great time which was fantastic as it was a rainy day and kept them busy. Most of the photo opportunities were free with a couple you had to pay the professional photographer as you couldn’t take a picture yourself. The professional shots were expensive but well done.
    Written 9 March 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • The largest library in HK with over 10 floors
    Spacious and massive in heart of causeway Bay
    Very relaxing place with cafes and landscapes
    Many people come to surf the net and also to video chat with friends as it’s free
    Even to play video games 🤪🤪
    Written 1 January 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Leonhkny
    Hong Kong, China8,568 contributions
    Mei Ho House is part of Hong Kong's first public estate project. Now converted to a hostel, it has a small but illustrative museum showcasing the life of laymen in the 1950s and beyond. This is a great place to understand how the city had emerged from a humble refuge for Chinese immigrants to a cosmopolitan city where more than seven million people call it home.
    Written 19 January 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Sandra C
    Fuengirola, Spain90 contributions
    Interesting to see the way people lived. Some of the museum was under restoration when we visited. The side houses were mostly just empty spaces. Leaflets and signs in English. Located In walking distance from The Panda Hotel and the mtr in Tsuen Wan.
    Written 2 June 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Y F
    United Kingdom100 contributions
    We were only aware of this small museum whilst flicking through the rough guide book for something to do whilst we were in Kennedy town. What a little gem to find! All of it was interesting, especially as they had lots of old photos on display.

    There was displays on how heroin was made illegally and some items which were used to smuggle drugs around.

    various badges, various uniforms, medals etc were also on display.

    Bring your own food and water as they don’t sell any at the museum. There only sell commemorative books and the odd ‘old era’ police related postcards.

    There is a sign which states if large groups arrive, they have right to be let into the museum first before any other visitors, merely due to the size of the venue.
    Written 25 August 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Chocolate D
    Hong Kong, China44 contributions
    I have always joined the talks at Liangyi and it’s the first time that I actually visit the museum. Amazed by the large variety of collections they have and so happy to be able to actually touch the antiquities. Great tour guide as well!
    Written 19 February 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • BradJill
    Hong Kong, China146,662 contributions
    The Lei Cheng Uk Han Tomb is a Declared Monument found on Tonkin Street in the Sham Sui Po and Cheung Sha Wan area of Kowloon. The tomb is nearly 2000 years old and dates back to the early Eastern Han Dynasty. It can be visited as part of a small museum experience from 10am to 6pm daily (closed on Thursdays). Entry is free.

    What you will find is a small museum setup with technically three rooms. Gallery room 1 features historical context to the Han Dynasty, Silk Route and commercial trade items from that period. Gallery room 2 provides historical information about the discovery of the Lei Cheng Uk tomb, its architectural features as well as some info on the treasures unearthed from the tomb. There is a good short video the staff will play for you in English or Cantonese about the tomb. It is worth watching and is only a few minutes in length.

    You are then pointed out back to the actual tomb from which there is an opening protected by glass panel that you can peer through to see a small section of the inside of the tomb. Not easy to see inside the tomb and sort of difficult to understand what you are looking at if you didn't invest a few minutes in advance to read up on tomb and watch the video prior to going out to see it.

    After you looked into the tomb, you walk back into the museum and staff will point you to gallery room three where you will see many of the 58 items discovered within the tomb including pottery, bronze pieces and clay items. The clay house and granary are really neat to see. Interestingly, there were no skeletal remains found within the tomb when discovered.

    Overall, you can leisurely visit the Lei Cheng Uk Han Tomb and Museum leisurely in no more than 20-25 minutes max. After your visit, it is worth spending a few minutes walking through the adjacent Han Garden where the tomb and museum is located. This is a nice little park and good spot to rest your feet a bit before making your way to whatever sightseeing endeavours come afterwards.
    Written 17 September 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Col20
    Greater Sydney, Australia268 contributions
    If you are visiting Stanley Markets take time out to visit the Correctional Services Museum. It is free. It is about a 10 minute walk from the markets. You need to head up the hill towards Stanley Prison. There are a number of small galleries displaying photographs and artifacts. The displays are interesting and informative. I found the section on the Vietnamese Boatpeople the most interesting. The government of Hong Kong must have spent a great deal of money housing these refugees.
    Written 2 November 2017
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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