Mikhail Frunze Museum
Mikhail Frunze Museum
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4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles89 reviews
Excellent
33
Very good
27
Average
25
Poor
3
Terrible
1

Reza Sattarzadeh
Muscat, Oman2,549 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2019 • Solo
This museum is dedicated to the life of Mikhail Frunze, who is said to have been a candidate to replace Lenin in the early years of the Soviet Union. He is a character with whom many are unfamiliar but because of his special status even the city of Bishkek had been named after him for many years. It's interesting to spend some time in the museum learning about Funze.
Written 22 February 2020
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MumbaiRiders
Mumbai, India1,866 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2024 • Solo
Frunze Museum is dedicated to exhibiting artifacts of Mikhail Frunze and is a authentic "TIME CAPSULE" of the Soviet era.Many of the exhibits have a little sub-title in English language.Mikhail Vasilyevich Frunze(1885-1925) was a Soviet army officer and military theorist, regarded as one of the fathers of the Red Army.In 1926 the present city of Bishkek was renamed Frunze after Mikhail Frunze and in 1991 after formation of Kyrgyzstan the name was changed to Bishkek.The Frunze Military Academy, one of the most prestigious military educational institutions in the Soviet Union, was also named in his honour. The museum opened for the first time in December 1925, the aim with the creation of the museum was to commemorate Mikhail Frunze in the house where he was born.This house over which this museum stands was built in 1879 by Vasily Frunze, Mikhail's father. In 1967, the museum was renovated after the anniversary of the October Revolution, the muralists Alexei Kamensky and Alexander Voronin participated in the decoration of the building. In 2002, the building was added to the State List of Historic and Cultural Monuments of Republican Importance.In 2001, the museum contained about 6583 objects. Some of these artifacts were donated by Mikhail's family or friends, including furniture and plates. One of the main exhibits of the museum was an adobe hut.The museum contains books, manuscripts, documents, photographs and paintings. There have been a few thefts of some of the museum exhibits in 2014 and 2019.During my visit to the museum a teacher was guiding her young students across the exhibits in the museum.
Written 2 July 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Zemfira T
Mount Vernon, WA3 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2015 • Solo
My home town. Always loved this little museum. Very well maintained, plenty of very interesting artifacts. Gives a good idea of the middle class household at the end of the 19 -beginning of the 20th century.
Written 29 September 2015
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VonUngernSternberg
Burnham Market, UK260 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2013 • Family
The museum they'd rather you didn't see....so, driving through downtown Bishkek and guide person casually says, "on the right is museum of Mikhail Frunze". "Stop the car!" shouts I. "THE Mikhail Frunze? Hero of the Bolshevik revolution, the man who defeated The White admiral Kolchak in the east, the last White Army of General Wrangel in the Crimea and these who delivered Central Asia out of the dark ages, including taking the medievally cruel desert kingdom of Bukhara (whose Emir fled to Afghanistan, and dropped of, one by one, each of his favourite dancing boys to try and slow down the Bolshevik pursuit). The greatest Bolshevik general ever who had Bishkek renamed 'Frunze' after his death in 1926 at the impossibly young age of 40 (his doctor accidentally killed him with a chloroform overdose)? That Mikhail Frunze?" says I. "The very same" says she. "We're in!" says I.....and then it all went surreal (again). There were no other visitors, and a rather starchy desk woman who reminded me of my time behind the iron curtain in the late 1980's.... But the best was yet to come. Step forward 'Ludmilla' complete with severe pointing stick and 110% unreconstructed soviet era attitude and a burning glint in her eye. Never a good sign in my experience, (female) fanatics with pointing sticks talking about long dead generals.

The museum was an astonishing record of the early years of the Bolshevik revolution with hundreds of photographs, uniforms, regimental colours, weapons, etc..."Do you mind if we take photographs?" says I. Stony silence, followed by an outburst. "This is not an art gallery! This is a historical museum and therefore NO photographs can be taken!" barks she. Rory (my son) and me then noticed her Cheka henchwomen, fat babushkas in head scarves dreaming of what was all those years ago. Who followed our guided tour suspiciously. "Plan B" whispers I to Rory, which means 'you drop back and take surreptitious shots of all the stuff we like. Six shots in he was rumbled. It felt like a moment from a John Le Carre Cold War novel. I had visions of the eldest son of my loins being hauled off to a labour camp. 'Right' thinks I. 'Were going to have some fun here questioning some deeply held orthodoxies. The killer question proved to be: "Do you think Stalin would have murdered Frunze if he has lived longer into Stalins reign of terror". If I had been allowed to film, her face looked like the women who has just lost the pram in the 1917 classic 'Battleship Potemkin'. After digesting the affront she looked really scary (by smiling) and said coyly "no". "Well he murdered all his other best generals, other than Zhukov, who he was too scared to touch" scoffed I. Queue a scream of "it was Beria (Stalins chief lackey), not Stalin who did that. Stalin wouldn't do that!" Uncle Joe, eh? Loved his family and small animals. He'd never do something like that, would he?

So, what do you get: you get two museums for the price of one. One absolutely cracking museum about a historically significant 20th century soldier. And another, even better one, that of inside the mind of unreconstructed Soviet totalitarianism. Bargain.

Anyway, if you are in the area, take a hidden camera. It's worth it.
Written 21 September 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

808man
Honolulu, HI49 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2013 • Business
Bishkek gets its airport code (FRU) from this Communist who the Soviets sent to lead this city. The top floor has some photos of Mikhail and the old days and two Old Ladies patrol to ensure you don't take any photos. Some of the displays have English translations, most not. The second floor is a tribute to the old Soviet Union and the ground floor is a traditional Kyrgyzstan house.
Written 17 July 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

CFValencia
Riga, Latvia1,040 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2012 • Friends
Quite small, very Soviet and interesting if that's what you're into. One of the highlights is a scale replica of his house on the bottom floor. The lack of English language descriptions is what lets an otherwise worthy museum down.
Written 3 January 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Firoz U
London, UK574 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2018 • Solo
This museum reproduces Frunze’s house with some original artefacts inside. I would not recommend the museum unless you are very interested in his history. The museum is comprised of 2 floors, the bottom taking up the reproduced house the second floor that has pictures of Frunze.
Written 7 September 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Kristine_Archi
Washington DC, DC49 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2018 • Friends
If you are feeling nostalgic for the Soviet days, if you do not mind that not all of the many photos are captioned in English, if you enjoy being in dusty/musty places, and if you would like to see a museum that has been built around a thatch-roofed house from the end of the 19th century -- this place is for you.

It is amazing that the exhibits have apparently changed so little since the Soviet days. Do not miss the map that is color-coded to the dates that various regions fell to the Bolsheviks. But alas -- there they are, just for you! (Foreigners, you are asked to pay over three times what Kyrgyzstanis pay to visit this museum. Still, it is the equivalent of $1.46.)

There was a beautiful photo exhibition on the ground floor of various women's traditional headdresses and other garb when we visited.
Written 10 June 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Robert O
Rotterdam, The Netherlands5,517 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2018 • Solo
Without people like Mikhail Frunze there would have been no Soviet Union. Frunze was born in Bishkek, son of a Moldovan father and a Russian mother who were settlers on Kyrgyz lands. Mikhail belonged to the first generation of revolutionary Soviet leaders who made sure the old Tsarist regime was thoroughly defeated. Frunze was an energetic and intelligent leader who made things work on the ground.

Frunze died of natural causes in 1925 long before the big purges under Stalin began. Perhaps for this reason his reputation was never disputed. Other men of the same caliber like Zinoviev and Trosky were executed.

Entrance fee 100 som for foreigners.
Many exhibits have at least some description in English.
Written 16 May 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Daran71
Cardiff, UK342 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2018 • Friends
This Soviet Museum has soviet style miserable staff, but is still worth a brief visit. Only half the captions are in English but it is an interesting place for an hour.
Written 2 April 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Mikhail Frunze Museum, Bishkek

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